If you laughed at that picture, you learned your astronomy in a better, older time.
5 Bafflingly Prudish Moments in History

#5. We Needed a Less-Naughty Pronunciation of “Uranus”
I remember learning about Uranus as a kid, and everyone laughed, and then we stopped, because, y’know, even though it’s a damn fine joke — because it sounds like a body part, get it — it got old at around 9 years old. But apparently scientists and newscasters got tired of seeming silly, so they changed the pronunciation of “Uranus.” Oh, let me help you: “URAN-us,” which, as it turns out, still has “urine” in it, so it’s still kind of funny, but not as funny as “your anus.”

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If you laughed at that picture, you learned your astronomy in a better, older time.

5 Bafflingly Prudish Moments in History

#5. We Needed a Less-Naughty Pronunciation of “Uranus”

I remember learning about Uranus as a kid, and everyone laughed, and then we stopped, because, y’know, even though it’s a damn fine joke — because it sounds like a body part, get it — it got old at around 9 years old. But apparently scientists and newscasters got tired of seeming silly, so they changed the pronunciation of “Uranus.” Oh, let me help you: “URAN-us,” which, as it turns out, still has “urine” in it, so it’s still kind of funny, but not as funny as “your anus.”

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[via]

[via]

If you only discover one icy Hawaiian space football today, make it this one.
5 Mind-Blowing Things Found Hiding in Our Own Solar System

#3. Loads of Extra Planets (Including a Football-Shaped One)
So far, we’ve officially classified five dwarf planets right here in our solar system (although we’ve observed many more): Pluto, Eris, Ceres, Makemake, and Haumea. …The one of particular note right now is the icy dwarf planet Haumea, discovered in 2004. Named after the Hawaiian goddess of childbirth, Haumea is a frozen rock uncannily resembling a football one-tenth the size of Earth. At least that’s what complex science calculations tell us about the planet. We haven’t yet physically observed Haumea, but we do know some things about it — like that it exists in a perpetual, hellish cycle of freezing death and rebirth.

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If you only discover one icy Hawaiian space football today, make it this one.

5 Mind-Blowing Things Found Hiding in Our Own Solar System

#3. Loads of Extra Planets (Including a Football-Shaped One)

So far, we’ve officially classified five dwarf planets right here in our solar system (although we’ve observed many more): Pluto, Eris, Ceres, Makemake, and Haumea. …The one of particular note right now is the icy dwarf planet Haumea, discovered in 2004. Named after the Hawaiian goddess of childbirth, Haumea is a frozen rock uncannily resembling a football one-tenth the size of Earth. At least that’s what complex science calculations tell us about the planet. We haven’t yet physically observed Haumea, but we do know some things about it — like that it exists in a perpetual, hellish cycle of freezing death and rebirth.

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"Uranus, one of the cold bags of farts in the outer solar system, had been found to have irregularities in its own orbit, and someone worked out that this was because something big and heavy was pulling it around out there. A short search later, we found another cold bag of farts in the outer solar system, which would soon be known as Neptune." [via]

"Uranus, one of the cold bags of farts in the outer solar system, had been found to have irregularities in its own orbit, and someone worked out that this was because something big and heavy was pulling it around out there. A short search later, we found another cold bag of farts in the outer solar system, which would soon be known as Neptune." [via]

Discover the astronomical wonders of the [Wilhelm scream] System.
5 Real Planets Way Weirder Than Anything in Science Fiction

#5. The Light-Eater Planet
Orbiting a star in Draco, the constellation of the dragon (little known fact: most of space was named by John Carpenter), TrES-2b is the darkest planet humans have ever discovered. How dark are we talking about here? It absorbs (or “feasts on,” if you will) 99 percent of the sunlight that reaches it, making it darker than coal, black acrylic paint, or your ex’s cold, unforgiving heart.

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Discover the astronomical wonders of the [Wilhelm scream] System.

5 Real Planets Way Weirder Than Anything in Science Fiction

#5. The Light-Eater Planet

Orbiting a star in Draco, the constellation of the dragon (little known fact: most of space was named by John Carpenter), TrES-2b is the darkest planet humans have ever discovered. How dark are we talking about here? It absorbs (or “feasts on,” if you will) 99 percent of the sunlight that reaches it, making it darker than coal, black acrylic paint, or your ex’s cold, unforgiving heart.

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Who knew a YouTube video could make the Solar System cute?

[hat tip Laughing Squid, gifs by ohmygodwaytoolong]

thedailywhat:

Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars
If you’re running on Chrome browser, check out Google’s latest Experiment project that visualizes the precise location of at least 100,000 stars in our Milky Way galaxy, using various imagery and data pulled from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). For your frame of reference, there are approximately 200 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

And there are approximately 176 billion galaxies in the known Universe. There is at least one Universe.

thedailywhat:

Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars

If you’re running on Chrome browser, check out Google’s latest Experiment project that visualizes the precise location of at least 100,000 stars in our Milky Way galaxy, using various imagery and data pulled from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). For your frame of reference, there are approximately 200 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

And there are approximately 176 billion galaxies in the known Universe. There is at least one Universe.